the red, white n’ blue and a log cabin ~

MarveLes Art Studios Art and Collage Quilts, Blogs, Mixing It Up 5 Comments

happy fourth of july!  

more than just red, white and blue, pink, yellow, and green also make themselves known in this vintage-style quilt.  made from reproduction prints, designed and pieced into this log cabin quilt by my friend annette.  she gave it to me to quilt, at least a year ago.  {maybe two?!}  lol

it was fun to quilt, even though it was a little tough to see with white thread on white fabric.  always makes it more of a challenge for me, especially with my eyes.  

i chose king tut 40 wt 100% cotton for the top thread, matched with masterpiece 50 wt 100% cotton in the bobbin, and a 90/14 topstitch needle, lowering my tension to 2.25. it’s a great combo! i also love my bernina #24 open toe “c” foot

image courtesy of the berninausa.com website}

awesome for the free motion work, especially feathers, where there needs to be precision, but more importantly, an open area so i can see where i’m going.

these are the corner blocks, below.  i did a ‘fan-shape’ {to the best of my ability}.  and i loved making the cute hearts in the red blocks, too.

kept the quilting pretty open and simplified in the busy prints.  it was also a bit of a challenge for me to work with so many seams.  this took about five hours to quilt.  i had kind of forgotten how much i need to move such a bulk of fabric, and keep it free flowing under my needle.  but it was all good ~ {i only had to rip a couple two or three times!}

simple loops and swirls for the patterned fabric.  love the feathers {big surprise huh}. 

 “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
There are several phrases associated with the Statue of Liberty, but the most recognizable is “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” This quote comes from Emma Lazarus’ sonnet, New Colossus, which she wrote for a fundraiser auction to raise money for the pedestal upon which the Statue of Liberty now sits. The poem did not receive much recognition and was quite forgotten after the auction.
In the early 1900s and after Lazarus’ death, one of her friends began a campaign to memorialize Lazarus and her New Colossus sonnet. The effort was a success, and a plaque with the poem’s text was mounted inside the pedestal of the statute.

isn’t it interesting that her name was ‘Lazarus?”  no coincidence, thank God!!  and thank God for our country, and may we as americans, get on our knees, in repentance, and in gratitude, know the beauty and fullness of His grace, hearing what God has called us to be as One Nation Under God…  that we might not just live in freedom casually, but live it out, as the priceless gift it is.

soli deo gloria

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